Radio Frequencies

FICORA steers and supervises the use of radio frequencies and grants licences for radio transmitters. FICORA carries out inspections concerning the use of radio frequencies, for example, at sports or cultural events in which the number of frequency users operating simultaneously is unusually high.

FICORA also investigates the causes of radio interference. If necessary, FICORA may even carry out inspections to investigate individual cases of radio interference.

FICORA regulates the frequencies assigned to different radio systems

The frequencies assigned to different radio systems are listed in the annex of FICORA's Radio Frequency Regulation (Frequency Allocation Table 9 kHz–400 GHz). The planning safeguards the fair availability of radio frequencies and the efficient, appropriate and sufficiently interference-free use of the frequencies.

Frequency Allocation Table

FICORA grants radio licences

The use of frequencies is guided by granting licences that entitle the holder to possess and use a radio transmitter. All radio transmitters require a licence from FICORA, unless the equipment is separately exempted from licensing. Receivers do not require a licence. Radio licences are only granted to equipment that complies with requirements. The use of some frequencies may also require a certificate of competence. FICORA investigates the causes of radio interference on the basis of customer complaints and its own monitoring activities.

FICORA investigates causes of radio interference

Radio systems are vulnerable to external and often unpredictable interference. However, interference is often caused by a malfunction or some other technical defect in the radio system or receiver itself. When interference occurs, the possibility that it is caused by a technical malfunction must always be ruled out. Examine the condition of antenna cables and connections. Try using another device to see if the original device is faulty.

Ask whether your neighbours or other people in the area are experiencing similar interference, for example, in the reception of radio and television broadcasts. If you are the only one with a problem, the source of interference is likely to be in your own house.

Advice for investigating radio interference 

Inspections concerning the use of radio frequencies

To supervise compliance with radio licence conditions, FICORA carries out inspections at radio stations and, for example, sports and cultural events in which the number of frequency users operating simultaneously is unusually high. If necessary, FICORA may also carry out inspections to investigate individual cases of radio interference.

Manufacturing and selling of radio and telecommunications terminal equipment and network equipment

Provisions on the responsibilities and obligations of the manufacturers, importers and retailers of radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment and the requirements and procedures concerning notified bodies are included in the Information Society Code (chapter 30). The regulation concerns the procedures for assessing the conformity of products and placing them on the market. The provisions are based on the directive on radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment

Supervision of CE markings

Information Society Code, chapter 41 (sections 325 to 329): Inspections and Prevention of Radio Interference (in Finnish)


Key words: Spectrum , Faults and disturbances , Regulations , Licences

Updated 03.02.2015

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