Customer queries received by FICORA 2014

Every year, FICORA receives tens of thousands of customer queries that open up a viewpoint towards FICORA's sector. Customer queries mostly deal with the acquisition of services offered by FICORA, such as domain names, telecommunications network numbers, permits or certificates. In addition, FICORA receives queries from communications service users who approach FICORA, for example, when encountering problems.

In 2014, FICORA received a total of 58,520 queries from customers. More than half of these (some 30,000 queries) dealt with fi- domain names. FICORA received more than 3,500 queries related to communications services. These queries were associated with the functionality of telephone and broadband connections, postal services, internet services, privacy protection, and the handling of personal data. FICORA received nearly 5,000 queries related to information security, more than the year before. In 2014, customers sent close to 8,000 queries regarding radio frequencies. These mostly concerned disruptions in TV and radio broadcasting, radio licences and proficiency examinations. Even through the obligation to pay a TV fee was discontinued at the end of 2012, FICORA received in 2014 some 12,000 queries related to TV fees. Most of these concerned the collection of unpaid TV licences and the refund of excess payments that were abandoned on 1 January 2015.


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Figure: Customer queries received by FICORA in 2014.

In broadband services, queries sent by customers in 2014 concerned regional differences in broadband availability and prices. On a yearly basis, FICORA receives masses of queries related to the functionality and speed of fixed-line and mobile broadband. Through the popularity of subscriptions built using fibre-optic technologies, queries related to optical fibre have also increased. In particular, delays in and cancellations of deliveries of fibre-optic subscriptions caused concern among customers.

In terms of telephone services, the cover-age of mobile subscriptions raises interest among customers every year. The dismantling of the fixed-line network and the availability of fixed-line telephone and broadband subscriptions continue to attract attention.

With regard to television and radio, a significant number of queries concern disturbances in broadcasting and problems with reception. A new theme that has raised its head in recent years is the disturbance caused by the construction of wind farms and the 4G network, with related customer queries being in a steep incline. Through the increased popularity of HD channels, their availability causes more concern than before. In addition, decisions on TV sponsoring raised attention similar to that of the year before. Interest towards sponsoring is partly related to FICORA's decision concerning the Seinäjoki Tango Festival broadcast by YLE and sponsored harness racing, and its last year's decision concerning the national lottery.

Disruptions in mail deliveries and lost shipments were emphasised in queries related to postal services. An unusually large number of queries concerning the delivery of mail were received in spring 2014 due to employee dismissals in postal services. Moreover, closed post offices have resulted in customer queries.

FICORA also receives queries from customers regarding themes that are not covered by its supervisory scope. Statistics of such queries are also compiled from the point of view of sector monitoring. In 2014, key themes were questions related to the customer service and marketing of telecommunications operators. FICORA received queries regarding long queuing times to customer service and additional charges collected for paper tele-phone or broadband invoices. The types of subscriptions operators can sell and market as 4G subscriptions also raised attention.

This article is a part of FICORA's Communications Sector Review 2014 (1/2015).


Key words: Information security, Internet, Post, Radio, Telephone, Television, Broadband, Customer service, Articles, Reviews, Statistics


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